Hunting in creeks, rivers and Lakes

 

I have found that a sand scoop is pretty useless for recovering targets in creeks, rivers and beaches that are full of packed rocks, gravel and sands. Instead a good sturdy hand pick is lighter than a beach sand scoop and better at breaking up the rock and sand.

Once you have the big rocks removed and gravel and sand broken up from being compacted over thousands of years, you use a technique that I first learned about viewing the Youtube guy gigmaster which you can see in this video. He scoops out the gravel/sand with his left hand and and right hand still holding the beeping pinpointer. As you can see if the beeping stops as he is lifting out the handful gravel/rocks, then no extracted target. He keeps repeating the process until the target comes up with the handful. Pretty neat and efficient. Thanks gigmaster!

 

 

The Gold Jewelry Numbers inland searching

 

This is an accurate video when it comes to digging gold jewelry inland as opposed to beach hunting. One comment to this video question the need to dig all targets when hunting gold jewelry. I will just tell the guy who made the comment to just look at the AT Pro VDI chart. Notice that there is no single VDI number or close by numbers that can accurately indicate gold jewelry. Gold jewelry values shows all over the VDI chart. That is the reason you have to dig all signals in an area that is likely to have gold jewelry like parks. Hunting ocean beaches is a completely different story. There is less junk on an ocean beach and junk on an ocean beach means different things on the lower beach and upper beach. Light junk (pop tops, tin cans, fishing lures) on the lower beach (wet and in water) means you are not going to find jewelry at that spot. Heavy junk like lead weights, nails, old corroded coins indicate you are likely to find heavy gold and silver jewelry. On the upper beach light junk like pull tabs, foil and tin cans indicate people activity and thus likely that you will find gold jewelry lost from the sun bather. So on inland hunts, you have little choice but to dig all signals above 35 on the AT Pro to be sure not to miss the gold. You may dig a hundred or more junk finds before you strike gold.

Compare Garrett 9×12″ Concentric Coil with Stock 8.5×11″ DD

Ok, just viewed an air test of the Garrett 9×12″ concentric coil vs the Garrett Stock 8.5 x 11″ Double D coil. He used the two coils on the AT Max. The test was done  on an individual’s metal detecting channel on Youtube. Full disclosure requires me to let you know that I like most of his videos and being well filmed and an accurate representation of the metal detecting hobby with little or no hype.

Now here is where I fault his air test. The air test shows the concentric coil delivering better results on deep targets. Well that is a given due to the different coil designs. The DD coil will deliver a full 11″ swath at max depth whereas the concentric coil (using a cone pattern) will deliver only an inch or so swath at maximum depth. So now lets figure in the hunting time looking for deep objects. It is 11 to 1 ration in favor of the Double D coil. So a 2 hour hunt of a specific area with the  Double D coil will turn into to a 22 hour hunt using the concentric coil.

On the upper beach or volley ball court or areas where the targets are only 2″ deep, then the coils are basically equal. On a search for deep coins or jewelry, you could not possibly consider using a concentric coil.

 

Metal Detecting Hazards – snakes, spiders, wasps, yellow jackets and poisonous plants

We often forget that when we go metal detecting whether in the woods or even in seemingly safe neighborhoods we are at the mercy of poisonous snakes, venomous spiders, wasps and yellow jackets and the ever present tick which can cause lime disease. And then there is poison ivy, sumac and ok to worry about.

 

I always spray on insect repellant that contains 25% deet around my boots, feet and ankle areas and any other areas of exposed skin. More than  once I have forgotten to spary and found some ticks up in my groin area where they seem to particularly fond of. My dermatologists told me you must get a shot when you find a tick on your body to prevent lime disease. Good advice is don’t stick your hand anywhere you cannot clearly see. Don’t put them in holes (your dug holes are ok), under boards, in rock nooks. You may surprise a snake or spider and they may do more than surprise you. Using good gloves is a good practice. I once was digging a hole and felt a sharp bite and it was a spider in the ground. It got my finger but other than the brief pain, not harm was done. I was lucky that time. I always wear good gloves at all times when digging for finds.  In the south we have to be especially careful of yellow jacket nests. They have a tendency for all of them attack a person or animal when you are near their nest. I have experienced this three times in my life (all when just wearing shorts and tee shirts) and found it to be very painful. Had to take some Benadryl capsules to lessen the pain. When you see more than one yellow jacket flying near you, be aware that you might be close to their nest. Avoid that area at all costs. Save that area to hunt in the dead of the winter. If you get bit by a snake and don’t recognize it as a poisonous snake, then look at the bleeding holes. Water moccasins, rattle snakes and copperheads have fangs and will leave two evenly spaced puncture marks. You need to seek treatment ASAP! Non-poisonous snakes leave small multiple puncture marks with their many teeth, not just two fang marks. Be aware of lakes, rivers and creeks, they are the favored by the snakes because of the fish and frog they eat as food. The non-poisonous snakes have a chemical in their mouths that make you bleed more. This is really nothing to worry about. In the south you don’t have to worry as much about these hazards during the late fall and winter. But come spring and summer you have to very much aware of these dangers when metal detecting. So be aware and be safe in your metal detecting hunts.

Getting permission to hunt a property

Taken from metaldetectingguides.com – For a number of reasons, getting permission to hunt a property was always difficult for me. Many experienced metal detectorists will tell you to just go up and knock on the door and ask for permission to hunt a property. They can only tell you no and they probably won’t shoot you. Others have suggested that the younger and older property owners seem to give permission to search more often than middle aged property owners. I found a relative new and painless way to get hunting permissions on some choice old homes nearby. This is with posting a short note in nextdoor web page. This is a new local neighborhood discussion group that seems very active. Every month or so I post a notice that I am retired and enjoy metal detecting as a hobby and am willing to search any older home property for free and will share my finds with the owner. This almost always brings in 1-3 offers to search some homes built between 1900 and 1970 that have never been searched. Note: nextdoor web page is kind of exclusive since you must prove you live in the area by submitting a copy of one of your utility bills or be recommended by a neighbor. This keeps the web site under control and not out of control like craigslist. It is a trusted web site for this reason by neighbors. “There comes a time in every rightly constructed boy’s life that he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure.” – Mark Twain.

Metal Detecting – Finding Deep Coins in the Park

www.metaldetectingguides.com – Parks are never truly hunted out. Yes, silver coins are not just popping to the surface these says and in fact  they are going deeper every day. An Old gold prospector’s saying is “Every time it thunders the gold goes deeper.” Well the same can be said for silver. So you have to go deeper with your hunt. Wait for after a good soaking rain when the soil is deeply soaked and put on your head phones and use a large coil and listen for the deep silver and gold tones. You may find that the park is only hunted out for the easy targets.

Finding Deep Coins metal detecting
Finding Deep Coins metal detecting

Turn $27 Morgan Coin into $90 Silver Ring in 15 minutes

Turn $27 Morgan Coin into $90 Silver Ring in 15 minutes

How to double or triple your money by creating unique rings with  Morgan Silver Dollars worth about $27 -$30 on ebay. Sell your newly created rings for $79 – $90 on ebay. Yes, you have to invest in some tools  like the six ton hydraulic A frame press for $94 at Walmart.

Setting up a day long ocean beach camp

On a beach hunt you are often hunting a beach 20-30 minutes hiking time away from your car. To have more beach hunting time you need to bring what you need for an all day beach hunt. You do this by establishing a beach hunt base camp.  This starts with a light weight 4 wheeled sports cart like the one you can buy at Dick Sporting Goods Store for $59. Now you can take a beach umbrella, lots of water, favorite foods, towels your metal detecting gear a portable chair. In short anything you need to relax in comfort between beach hunts. Pull the cart on the wet sand to your beach hunt base camp and set up your camp. You then can hunt up and down the beach. When you are ready to move, simply pull your cart further up or down the beach to your new hunt location. I have used this portable base camp transport method often on all day hunts.  I find that resting and recharging in comfort every 2 hours makes for a much more pleasant and effective metal detecting day. For base camp beach security, I place my Carlon Vibration Alarm in the cart (available on line and at Walmart). If anyone tries to rummage around in the cart the Ultra loud 100dB alarm will sound. It has gone off once when I was about 200 yards away from the cart and a male teen was snooping through my cart. He quickly took off walking fast like he was not doing anything. Of course my wallet and keys are always with me unless I am hunting in deeper water.  HH Samuel